© 2019 Copyright Patrick Cornelissen

New England's Mini Pebble

July 17, 2017

Lauded as an east coast mini Pebble, the Misselwood Concours offers an intimate boutique setting to discover automotive beauty in a stunning environment.

What started in 2010 as a modest show has grown to a mature concours that remains unique in every aspect. Purposely kept small in size, Misselwood offers an eclectic showfield that, due to the nature of its grounds, surprises around every corner. Looking back at past Best of Show marques with names such as Duesenberg, Packard, Rolls Royce, and Cunningham in its pedigree, the winning list reads as a who's who of the automotive world. And for 2017 this was no exceptions.

 

While it certainly helps to have the Atlantic Ocean as your backdrop, the area surrounding the Misselwood Concours offers the best of coastal New England: historic seaports, colonial era farms, rocky shorelines, and a wealth of significant architecture. A mere mile up the road sits the charming train station of Prides Crossing, where wealthy Bostonians arrived in their own rail cars and disembarked for their summer vacations. Henry Clay Frick, who made his fortune in steel, and Edward Carelton Swift, at one time the owner of the largest meat packing operation in the U.S, were among the best known of these summer residents. Neighboring Manchester-by-the-Sea, for many years referred to as "a playground for millionaires”, was always a favorite of the diplomatic community. It therefore comes to no surprise that, in this classy setting, the Misselwood Concours offers a glimpse of yesteryear's luxury lifestyle.

 

With cars and motorcycles literally scattered around every possible corner, the Misselwood Concours is like a millionair's maze, with hidden treasures popping up everywhere. Celebrities such as Paul Teutel Jr. were seen admiring the automotive beauty. He may even have walked away with some design ideas for an upcoming TV show, as there was plenty to get inspired by, such as the stately 1931 Pierce Arrow Model 43 or the elegantly curved 1960 Aston Martin DB4 GT.

 

The Amelia Choice Award, handed out by Amelia Concours Director of P.R. Dr. Chris Brewer, went to a beautiful 1968 AC Cobra. With everything from a 1913 Packard I-38 Phaeton to a 1969 Triumph Tiger 650 motorcycle, to an 1988 Ferrari Mondial, there was definitely something for every generation to admire. One of the shows most unique vehicles, which you may have seen up close at the Hilton Head or Amelia Concours in prior years, must have been the one of three surviving 1973 Mohs Safarikar dual cowl Phaeton prototypes. The aluminium custom body was designed to go big game hunting, and featured reinforced movable doors, a retractable roof, special designed gun holders and three Steve McQueen Baja racing seats.

 

Top honors went to a stunningly restored 1914 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Alpine Model. With the car's 43YB chassis and original Brewster body reunited in 2015, this remains one of the best examples that exist. What is even more fascinating is that the current owners use this as a driver and partake in various tours and events each year, the way these impressive machines should be treated. I had the privilege to ride in the back seat during the first leg of the Tour d'Elegance on the Saturday prior to the event. The smoothness of the engine is simply incredible and its silent running should be admired by any modern-day car manufacturer.

 

Closing in on its tenth anniversary in 2019, the Misselwood Concours is a must-attend event for any serious classic car enthousiast, and as it takes place in July, it makes for a perfect warming-up event to the Pebble Beach Concours.

 

 

 

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